r/videos Jun 12 '21

The Japanese Keyboard Feature English Desperately Needs

https://youtu.be/vJQ3irFsqV0
18 Upvotes

13

u/philmarcracken Jun 12 '21

IME inputs are not unique to japanese

2

u/AnthoAsho Jun 12 '21

Indeed! I'm only comfortable in Japanese so I put focus on it, I hope the video didn't give the impression that it's exclusive to Japanese.

3

u/surprisedropbears Jun 12 '21

Love all the people nitpicking the fuck out of this.

It was a solid video - looks like this is your first ever youtube video?

It's put together very nicely, I would not at all assume you're an amateur. Keep it up, I'm sure you can come up with more interesting ideas.

2

u/AnthoAsho Jun 13 '21

Thank you very much - I appreciate it! I'll take the nitpicking constructively for next time, so it's not so bad.

3

u/The_Roflburger Jun 12 '21

Windows + period brings up an emoji and symbol list👍 It's all I need🤷‍♂️

1

u/BuxtonTheRed Jun 12 '21

Yeah but it doesn't have type-search for symbols. It's got it for emoji which is 🤩 but if I want to put in a β then it not only requires swapping from keyboard to mouse to click over to the Symbols tab (and then another click to get to the Language Symbols tab within that) and then manually finding the thing I want.

If MS put in the effort, that could just get upgraded in a future Win 10 feature update though, which would be Super Nice ™.

1

u/CancerSurvivor420 Jun 13 '21

How do you exit out of it with the keyboard? edit: weird you just hit escape. It wasn't working originally. 😲

1

u/Pi_314159 Jun 13 '21

You can also backspace out of it

1

u/Beeht Jun 12 '21

Going to be honest. I have no interest in this but I watched it because he's cute.

0

u/scarredMontana Jun 12 '21

Did he stick a mic in his mouth?

6

u/AnthoAsho Jun 12 '21 edited Jun 12 '21

Feedback noted!

0

u/Kid_Pussy Jun 12 '21

Did you stick your keyboard up your ass?

1

u/scarredMontana Jun 12 '21

No.

0

u/scarredMontana Jun 12 '21

It sounds like he did.

-2

u/GaylordRetardson Jun 12 '21

I don't think the etymology of the word alphabet invalidates the modern definition - if they have symbols used to represent sounds, words, or parts of words, it's an alphabet.

3

u/Inspector_Sands Jun 12 '21

Pretty much all writing systems have have symbols used to represent sounds, words, or parts of words. Calling them all alphabets is mashing alot of very different systems together and obscures rather than clarifies the differences between them.

-2

u/GaylordRetardson Jun 12 '21 edited Jun 12 '21

The word alphabet isn't meant to clarify the difference between different alphabets. It's just an accurate word that describe the general system of writing symbols to represent sounds/words.

That's like saying calling a dog an animal is obscuring the difference between them and other animals. That wouldn't be a problem with the way society uses the word "animal", it would be a problem with you wanting the word to have a different definition and play a different role in language than it does.

If you want to say something more specific that does highlight the difference, maybe find a more specific word or phrase instead of complaining about the fact that definition of the word alphabet is too general and asserting that people who are using the dictionary definition are actually using the word incorrectly.

2

u/Inspector_Sands Jun 12 '21

There are many different writing systems that represent sounds, words, or parts of words. Calling them all alphabets is simply wrong.

An alphabet represents the individual sounds of a language, whether consonant or vowel. That is different from a logogram, which represents the words themselves. Which is different from an abjad, which only represents consonants. Which is different from an abugida, which represent a consonant with a default vowel and changing the vowel requires a diacritic.

Calling them all "alphabets" is like calling all four legged carnivores "dogs".

-1

u/GaylordRetardson Jun 12 '21 edited Jun 12 '21

It's really bizarre that you're ignoring the fact that the reason I'm using it as an umbrella category for all of those things is because it's the fucking definition:

a set of letters or other characters with which one or more languages are written especially if arranged in a customary order.

The idea that it has to have consonants and vowels to be an alphabet is just some bullshit that you made up.

3

u/[deleted] Jun 12 '21 edited Jun 25 '21

[deleted]

-1

u/GaylordRetardson Jun 12 '21 edited Jun 12 '21

Are you illiterate? I just gave you the definition. I didn't pull it out of my ass. Open up your dictionary if you don't believe me.

a set of letters or other characters with which one or more languages are written especially if arranged in a customary order.

It doesn't become "not an umbrella term for all writing systems" just because you stubbornly re-iterated it in the face of an actual source, and beyond that "writing system" doesn't necessarily refer to specifically the set of symbols - e.g. "writing system" could also mean grammar and the way you connect symbols.

People use alphabet to describe systems of symbols used in written language because that's what the word means, regardless of whether or not they're familiar with other writing systems. It's just the correct term.

2

u/ZeroSobel Jun 12 '21

1

u/GaylordRetardson Jun 13 '21

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/alphabet

Normally I don't complain about wikipedia as a source because they cite their sources, but in this case the claim in the article isn't even linked to a source like normal, and wikipedia itself uses the term on articles about japanese language so you can't even claim they're consistent in not considering it an alphabet. So in this case, you're citing a sentence that a stranger on the internet wrote.

-1

u/Adderkleet Jun 12 '21

It's just an accurate word that describe the general system of writing symbols to represent sounds/words.

There's really no English equivalent to katakana/hiragana... well, unless you use the phonemes from the IPA. English letters are not English phonemes. Hiragana and katakana are phonemes, not letters.

So, either we don't use the English "alphabet" or Japanese lacks an "alphabet".

Japanese doesn't really have a fixed order for their phonemes. And katakana and hiragana are used differently depending on context. And then there's the kanji.

2

u/blakerabbit Jun 12 '21

Japanese kana (hiragana and katakana) are syllables, not phonemes. And there are, in fact, at least two established orders to the syllabary, one practical and one (called the いろは - iroha) poetic/traditional.

1

u/Adderkleet Jun 13 '21

Okay. English letters are not syllables.

0

u/GaylordRetardson Jun 13 '21

The word "alphabet" doesn't specify whether or not the letters have to be specific phonemes.

So we use the English "alphabet", japanese has multiple "alphabets", and you made up an extra restriction that isn't in the definition in order to pretend you have an argument.

0

u/Adderkleet Jun 13 '21

The word "alphabet" doesn't specify whether or not the letters have to be specific phonemes.

NOUN
An alphabet is a set of letters usually presented in a fixed order which is used for writing the words of a particular language or group of languages.

I didn't "make up an extra restriction". Most definitions of alphabet refer to letters explicitly. But if you wanna be descriptivist (which I usually am, too) then... do Japanese use hiragana like an alphabet? Sometimes. The gojuon is pretty close

1

u/GaylordRetardson Jun 13 '21 edited Jun 13 '21

Very odd that you say most, but if you link to any commonly used dictionary, it gives a definition that allows for "symbols" (even if one definition mentions letters):

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/alphabet
https://www.dictionary.com/browse/alphabet
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/definition/english/alphabet#:~:text=alphabet-,noun,used%20for%20writing%20a%20language

Also interesting that that even the dictionary you used allows for "letters" to be symbols representing any sound in a language, so your own source doesn't even agree with you and you'd know that if you were a little more thorough instead of being a lazy ass.

Letters are written symbols which represent one of the sounds in a language. --

0

u/[deleted] Jun 13 '21

[deleted]

1

u/GaylordRetardson Jun 13 '21

Are you pretending to not know what "especially" means?