6

COMMENT 5h ago

This dude is a dead ringer for my cousin when's he's had too much coke. Freaky.

1

COMMENT 7h ago

At present, there is no link between viral illness and the formation of Lewy bodies. We've known about Lewy bodies for over 100 years, but they are still shrouded in mystery and that puzzle has not been solved.

But, over the last several decades, many studies have been done looking for an association between viruses and Lewy bodies or parkinsonism, and so far no association has been found. There is no reason to believe this will be any different with covid.

One can always argue that anything is possible. But is it likely? No. Even remotely probable? I wouldn't think so.

1

COMMENT 8h ago

I don't know what it means. I don't think anyone does yet. If it is indeed true that Lewy bodies were found in the brains of macaques - and I don't know why anyone would lie about that - they came from somewhere. Did the coronavirus create them? No one knows. Were the animals already harboring some kind of prion disease we don't know about? No one knows. Was there some kind of contamination in the lab? No one knows. Does infection with coronavirus cause Lewy bodies in other animals or humans? Not that I've seen published so far. I also don't know how much SARS-CoV2 these macaques were dosed - 10x human exposure? 100X? Does it matter? I don't know.

One thing I do find interesting is that even though all coronaviruses have prion-like domains (as do human cells), SARS-CoV2 is the only coronavirus that has a prion-like domain in the actual spike. The other coronaviruses only have prion-like domains in other parts of the virus. But, while interesting, I don't know if there are any implications of that.

I guess the short answer is, we don't know yet. Maybe we're even lucky that prion-like domain is there on the spike of SARS-CoV2. SARS-CoV1 lacks it, and we all know how that turned out.

As for the long-term outcome for humans that are infected with covid, that is an open question that unfortunately will only be answered by the passage of time and observing what happens to them down the line. Hopefully, they just clear the virus with no severe long term consequence.

1

COMMENT 8h ago

It does if 19 variants pop up between now and Denver Variant.

Epsilon is actually next on the list. We should be hearing about that one shortly.

10

COMMENT 9h ago

Lol. No. The image should have been a tip-off. Notice it says "Live Attenuated" on the label? Australia does not use any live attenuated covid vaccines. Only Pfizer and AstraZeneca.

People really need to try harder.

9

COMMENT 9h ago

It's too soon for the mark of the beast. The seven seals haven't even been opened yet.

2

COMMENT 9h ago

What's a True American?

1

COMMENT 10h ago

I have no idea what any of this means. But, thanks....I guess?

1

COMMENT 10h ago

No one says it's your job to worry about the health of other people. I get paid for that very thing, so it is kind of my job to worry about the health of other people. You don't have to if you don't want to. Knock yourself out.

1

COMMENT 10h ago

I'm not ignoring the various agendas at play here. Pharma making bank. Politicians bidding for re-election. Infighting among researchers attempting to discredit each other and make a name for themselves. Doctors pushing ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine to get patients in the door to bill for exams and bloodwork.

I am very aware of the competing agendas and opportunistic power grabs going on. I just try to tune out the chatter and focus on the death certificates of these people. And what do you see? Obesity. Hypertension. Diabetes. Heart Disease. All these conditions make you vulnerable and high-risk to all kinds of bad outcomes. Even to something as simple as covid.

I understand people are trying to capitalize on this situation in every way imaginable, but I'm trying to ignore it. It's not helpful.

-2

COMMENT 10h ago

Yes, ivermectin is cheap, but the doctor visit, exam and bloodwork is not. And antivirals like Remdesivir cost over $3,000 per shot. And to even get Remdesivir you have to be admitted to the hospital and pay all that, too. Medical treatment for covid is insanely expensive in the US. And they send those bills directly to you, not to the taxpayers.

8

COMMENT 10h ago

Yes, that's why many mutations fail and never spread any further in that particular host population. They mutate themselves out of viability. It would be nice if all viruses did this. Instead, they come up with things like Delta, outcompeting all the other inferior mutants.

-5

COMMENT 10h ago

I agree those are all needed in a big way. The problem is (in the US) many people are not in a financial position to afford treatment for covid. It's really expensive. For a lot of people, a free, experimental vaccine is, in their minds, a better alternative than huge medical bills and lost wages from work due to covid infection and treatment. A lot of people are really between and rock and a hard place here.

-3

COMMENT 10h ago

It looked pretty bad in our ICU full of people dead and dying from it. It didn't look too bad at Walmart though, now that you mention it. Odd.

2

COMMENT 11h ago

I agree with you. We should be talking about it and we should be investigating all of it. I am in no way attempting to shut down the prion hypothesis. I hope researchers ARE looking at it and arguing about it. I hope they start publishing papers about it. And I wish the pissing contest in the vaccine research community would stop and these people start working together.

I would be happy to get vaxxed for covid once all these questions are answered. I'm not personally satisfied yet as to the ultimate safety of any of the covid vaccines out there.

1

COMMENT 11h ago

Oh, I agree with you. If the immune system is compromised it may not be able to mount a defense against either the actual virus or the vaccine. But the vaccine may provide a non-zero benefit to a percentage of immunocompromised people. From a purely safety standpoint, I don't think the vaccine is any less safe for the immunocompromised, it's just less effective.

-9

COMMENT 11h ago

The problem is that to achieve natural immunity you have to be infected with SARS-CoV2. Which for well over half the population is a bad idea - the old, the fat, the hypertensive, the diabetic. If we were all young and healthy and without comorbidities, natural immunity would be a great idea.

Humans, as a species, are grossly unhealthy. That is why covid caused such a problem in the first place. We're easy pickings.

There's only 3 ways to fix this. (1) return the human population to a state of good health. (2) develop good treatments for covid. (3) develop vaccines for the prevention of covid.

Unless you have other ideas? I'm not being snarky. I'd like to hear any other ideas you have about how to deal with this.

-1

COMMENT 11h ago

It's just the way mutations are named. Instead of naming the mutations after the city or country they pop up in they are named, alpha, beta, gamma, delta, etc. When the next one pops up in Denver, it will not be called Denver Variant - it will be named Omega or something neutral like that.

Delta is just the name of the mutation that first popped up in India.

-17

COMMENT 11h ago

You watch too much MSM. You'd be much better served spending your time reading medical and research journals than watching CNN and reading the NY Times.

4

COMMENT 12h ago

At some point, people are going to have to recognize that we're probably going to have to vaccinate the kids. If we don't, we are going to continue to have a huge pool of virus circulating in the population. People say, "So what? The kids don't get sick." Which is great. I'm glad they don't.

The problem is, as were seeing, this virus likes to mutate. And it's going to continue to mutate as long as it's allowed to circulate in the population. Maybe we'll get lucky and it mutates into a harmless common cold. Maybe we won't get lucky and it mutates into something more like SARS-CoV1 or MERS. Maybe it stays more or less the same.

Either way, this pool of virus carried by the kids and the unvaxxed adults is going to have to be dealt with somehow.

8

COMMENT 12h ago

There's really no reason not to vax the immunocompromised with mRNA, which contains no virus, dead or alive. You'd not want to give them a live attenuated virus vaccine or a killed virus vaccine or even an adenovirus virus vector vaccine, but an mRNA that contains no virus should be no less safe for them than it is for the rest of us.

11

COMMENT 12h ago

It depends on where the Delta mutation is on the RNA strand and how that mutation effects the spike composition and at what location. If the mutation drastically changes the spike proteins recognized by the vaccine, the immune system is going to have to start all over again. It seems that Delta is similar enough to the vaccine that the immune system does recognize it though, maybe just possibly not as quickly or as efficiently? They're still parsing that out.

As for the completely naive immune system (never infected, never vaxxed) it looks like Delta is outcompeting earlier strains and winning the infection race. It doesn't seem to be more "dangerous" per se, just more infectious

1

COMMENT 13h ago

That's the way most epidemics/pandemics start. They are smoldering at a low level somewhere until it encounters the spark that ignites the epidemic. Or the pathogen is endemic and harmless in its usual host, but creates catastrophe when a human host encounters it. Like ebola.

They've traced human HIV all the way back to the 1950s, yet it didn't blow up until 30 years later. Makes one wonder about all the stuff still lurking around out there that we don't know about - yet.

1

COMMENT 13h ago

I don't understand the logic either. Spike proteins are the devil incarnate and must be avoided at all costs. But covid is harmless in healthy people, who are teeming with spikes during infection.

You can't have it both ways.

1

COMMENT 13h ago

Your wait is over. Malone, et al, are saying the "prion-like" or "prion-potential" is in the RBD. So according to them, they've already found the location.

While it's true that the proteins in the RBD of SARS-CoV2 are arranged in a way slightly different than other coronaviruses, there is no indication that they fold into prions. But, let's say they do, just for argument's sake.

Let's say the RBD collapses, either pre or post fusion, into a prion. Prions cannot replicate, so that's not a problem. In order to create more prion, like itself, it needs to find other RBDs and encourage them to collapse into prions as well. Or maybe they even all collapse into prions together.

Lucky for us, our bodies are already making trillions of antibodies against S1 (and S2, but that's another discussion) and the antibodies tag S1 - including the RBD - for destruction. At this point, the T cells would have to malfunction and fail to dismantle the S1 properly, leaving prion-like RBD untouched. Okay. But then what? T cells are not APCs and the prion has no way to get out.

But wait....one day, the T cell undergoes apoptosis and the prion finds itself free again. Now it has to go find RBD to hook up with, but sadly the RBD is all gone because the immune system has killed it all.

Anyway, all I'm saying is that right now all we know is the coronavirus infection has shown Lewy bodies in the brains of certain animals on autopsy and that the RBD of the coronavirus is slightly different than other coronaviruses. You cannot leap to PRIONS!!!!! from that. And you cannot further leap to these prions - if they even exist - causing some kind of disease.